Radon In Your State
 

EPA Map of Radon Zones

The Map was developed using five factors to determine radon potential: indoor radon measurements; geology; aerial radioactivity; soil permeability; and, foundation type. Radon potential assessment is based on geologic provinces. Radon Index Matrix is the quantitative assessment of radon potential. Confidence Index Matrix shows the quantity and quality of the data used to assess radon potential. Geologic Provinces were adapted to county boundaries for the Map of Radon Zones.

Sections 307 and 309 of the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988 (IRAA) directed EPA to list and identify areas of the U.S. with the potential for elevated indoor radon levels. EPA's Map of Radon Zones assigns each of the 3,141 counties in the U.S. to one of three zones based on radon potential:

  • Zone 1 counties have a predicted average indoor radon screening level greater than 4 pCi/L (pico curies per liter) (red zones)
  • Zone 2 counties have a predicted average indoor radon screening level between 2 and 4 pCi/L (orange zones)
  • Zone 3 counties have a predicted average indoor radon screening level less than 2 pCi/L (yellow zones)

An Adobe Acrobat pdf version of the map is available (suitable for printing): color - zonemapcolor.pdf (327KB file) | black & white - b&wmap.pdf (98KB file)

You can view your State's radon potential map by clicking on your State below.

Alabama || Alaska || Arizona || Arkansas || California || Colorado || Connecticut || Delaware || Florida || Georgia || Hawaii || Idaho || Illinois || Indiana || Iowa || Kansas || Kentucky || Louisiana || Maine || Maryland || Massachusetts || Michigan || Minnesota || Mississippi || Missouri || Montana || Nebraska || Nevada || New Hampshire || New Jersey || New Mexico || New York || North Carolina || North Dakota || Ohio || Oklahoma || Oregon || Pennsylvania || Rhode Island || South Carolina || South Dakota || Tennessee || Texas || Utah || Vermont || Virginia || Washington || West Virginia || Wisconsin || Wyoming

EPA Map of Radon Zones

The purpose of this map is to assist National, State, and local organizations to target their resources and to implement radon-resistant building codes. This map is not intended to be used to determine if a home in a given zone should be tested for radon. Homes with elevated levels of radon have been found in all three zones. All homes should be tested regardless of geographic location.

IMPORTANT: Consult the EPA Map of Radon Zones document (EPA-402-R-93-071) before using this map [call your State Radon Contact for a copy of the Map and the Zones document]. This document contains information on radon potential variations within counties. EPA also recommends that this map be supplemented with any available local data in order to further understand and predict the radon potential of a specific area. If you have questions about radon in water, you should contact your State Radon Coordinator.

Home For Sellers Your Custom Report Inspection Day FAQ Services Mold Testing Radon Information Better Radon Testing Standards of Practice Code of Ethics Schedule Your Inspection Inspection Payments Septic Product Payments Septic Products Retrieve Your Report Links Customer Comments